Government Shutdown Ends; Overall Cost Is $11 Billion

After 35 days, the shutdown is over, but its effects still linger

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Government Shutdown Ends; Overall Cost Is $11 Billion

Congress met on Wednesday in order to avert a second government shutdown.

Congress met on Wednesday in order to avert a second government shutdown.

Photo by Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Congress met on Wednesday in order to avert a second government shutdown.

Photo by Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Photo by Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Congress met on Wednesday in order to avert a second government shutdown.

Natalie Pearson, Entertainment Editor

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The longest shutdown in U.S. history came to an end on January 25, after President Trump signed a bill that would temporarily reopen federal agencies. In the deal, the government will stay open until February 15, and during that time negotiators will try and work out a better compromise for immigration and border security.

However, although the shutdown may have ended, its effects are long-lasting. Federal workers went without pay for a little over a month. Many federal agencies were closed and could not provide services to the public, such as the Federal Food and Drug Administration.

Food inspections were delayed, people could not buy homes, and those who were victimized in crime could not receive money from the government.

A report from the Congressional Budget Office, released Monday, read that the economy took an $11 billion hit, of which $3 billion is lost forever.

“Among those who experienced the largest and most direct negative effects are federal workers who faced delayed compensation and private-sector entities that lost business. Some of those private-sector entities will never regain that lost income,” the report said.

Students were also marginally affected by the shutdown. The Department of Education had minimal staff, which meant there were not many people on-hand to help students, specifically universities. Anything already funded through federal grants would have continued, but there was a pause on approval for new funding, according to the Department of Education’s plan.

Financial aid was unaffected by the shutdown. It appears that the effects mostly impacted federal workers and small-time business owners.

As of January 30, Congress met on Capitol Hill in order to avert another government shutdown. No clear decision has been made yet.

Natalie Pearson

Natalie became a member of the Flightline in August of 2017. She is a junior this year, involved in band. Outside of school, she enjoys watching movies and playing video games. You can email her at [email protected]