McCain Dead at 81

U.S. Senator, war hero dies of cancer

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McCain Dead at 81

Photo by William Thomas Cain

Photo by William Thomas Cain

Photo by William Thomas Cain

Nathan Fletcher, Graphics Editor

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August 27, 2018 — John McCain died on August 25, 2018 after stopping treatment for brain cancer. A funeral for the Arizona senator will be held on Saturday, September 1.

McCain started his government career in the U.S. Navy in 1958 when he graduated from the United States Naval Academy. On October 26, 1967, he was captured by the North Vietnamese and transported to Hỏa Lò Prison.

In 1968, McCain was offered early release, but he refused unless all prisoners captured before him were also released; the Code of the United States Fighting Force Article III states: “I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy”. Following his refusal, he was subjected to severe torture. On March 14, 1973, McCain was released from the camp.

On return to the states, McCain took physical therapy to regain his strength. In 1974, his flight status was reinstated, and, in 1976, he was appointed commanding officer of a training squad in Florida. McCain retired as a captain on April 1, 1981.

McCain began his political career by running for U.S. Representative as a Republican in Arizona’s First Congressional District. After narrowly winning the primary, he easily won the general election. He was mostly politically aligned with then-President Ronald Reagan, but he often criticized keeping U.S. Marines in Lebanon. McCain was re-elected in 1984, and in 1986 he was elected to the U.S. Senate. In the 1990s, McCain earned a reputation for being a “maverick Republican”; he often voted against party lines.

McCain ran for the presidency in 2000 and again in 2008, losing to George W. Bush and Barack Obama respectively. He continued to serve in the Senate until his death.

“I felt sad that we lost someone…who had been such a leader in the Senate and someone who was willing to work across the aisle…I think that’s kind of gone by the wayside” Mrs. Meyer said. “I don’t really know [how this will impact the future]…hopefully someone will step up and take…the same kinds of actions that he took, but it’s hard to know if he can be replaced.”

Nathan Fletcher

Nathan became a member of The Flightline in August of 2017. He is a senior this year, involved in cross country, track, and drama, and can be found watching movies outside of school. You can email him at [email protected]