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Why You Should Delete Your Sinsta Right Now

The case for ditching the mask and staying real on Instagram

Secret+Instagrams+only+make+life+harder+for+everyone-+yourself+and+your+followers+included.
Secret Instagrams only make life harder for everyone- yourself and your followers included.

Secret Instagrams only make life harder for everyone- yourself and your followers included.

Photo by Maria Koliopoulos

Photo by Maria Koliopoulos

Secret Instagrams only make life harder for everyone- yourself and your followers included.

Lily Yates, Quintessence Editor-in-Chief

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No, edgyusernamehaver99, you really shouldn’t unleash that blurry photo of your thumb onto the world just so you can fill the rant-space below it with angst. Instagram, which began as a photo-centric social media platform, has spent the past few years devolving into nothing more than a strikingly convenient way to make poor choices publicly.

When I first heard about the phenomenon of people creating “secret Instagrams,” I didn’t understand the point. Isn’t the word “social” literally in Instagram’s definition? No matter how many lovably zany usernames one person creates or how carefully one could try to curate their followers, Instagrams are essentially public (especially so to eager screenshotters lurking within even the most trusted pools of followers).

Don’t get me wrong- I know of a few secret Instagrams, or alternate user accounts set to private and often called “Sinstas,” that serve as nothing but specialized places to showcase art, photos, or what have you. Considering that purpose rings true to the intent of the platform, and taking into account the fact that a photo of a nice sunset is probably hard-pressed to start any sort of drama, these accounts aren’t what I’m lodging my complaint against.

You know who I’m talking about. The paragraph-typers. The 3 a.m. soapboxers. The passive-aggressors. I mean, come on, the term “subtweet” (a term that spawned when Twitter users referred to people without directly tagging them) shouldn’t have been able to slime its way over here in the first place. Its home is in the name! To me, that cutesy-sarcastic post in which names aren’t named (but everything else is) is nothing more than a huge neon sign that reads “I crave drama! Pay attention!”

I’ll take a moment here to address the voice that is undoubtedly yelling at me about coping mechanisms and having the support of the masses. Hey, if you need to get something off your chest, I can understand that- buy a diary and burn the page, or phone a friend and rant until you can rant no more. Both of these options are considerably less risky for you, less uncomfortable for the people that follow you and arguably as satisfying.

What’s not a good look is when that post inevitably makes its way onto camera rolls, into conversation at school and worms its way between members of friend groups. You know that sort of churning feeling you get in your stomach when someone you don’t know all that well overshares in a pointed way? That awkward chuckle and anxious side-eye that leaves you feeling helpless and a little bit gross?

Spoiler alert: that’s how everyone (but maybe your very best friend) feels watching your vague personal drama hashed out publicly on your ironically-dubbed “Sinsta.”

So it comes down to a question of maturity, and of hesitating for the extra second it takes to consider someone else’s feelings. It’s easy to type up a tirade and hit that beckoning “post” button. But keep your complaints to face to face conversation or the last page of your math notebook, and I can promise your life (which, as a high schooler, is probably pretty crazy already) will get that much less stressful. Less comfortable, maybe, less validating, but less complicated in the end.

So delete that Sinsta today- you’re better than that. Your would-be followers and your real, live friends will thank you.

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Lily Yates - Quintessence Editor-in-Chief

Lily became a member of The Flightline in August of 2015. She is a senior this year and enjoys an array of activities including choir, theatre and slam poetry. She is also on staff as a library aide at the Omaha Public Library. You can email her at [email protected]

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