Student-Directed One Acts Hit the Stage

Juniors and seniors at Skutt Catholic step up to lead

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Student-Directed One Acts Hit the Stage

Skutt Catholic students performing one of the one acts

Skutt Catholic students performing one of the one acts

Photo by Zoe Clark

Skutt Catholic students performing one of the one acts

Photo by Zoe Clark

Photo by Zoe Clark

Skutt Catholic students performing one of the one acts

Zoe Clark, Copy Editor

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Behind the curtain, eight students sigh a breath of relief and congratulate their actors on a job well done.

Juniors MaryRose Olson, Andrew Pleskac, and Joseph McAuliffe, joined by seniors Cal Strawhecker, Corinne Chen, Levi Meyers, Ryan Lang, and Nick Sprague made up the crew of student directors.

“I decided to to do this because directing is such a great way to learn more about theatre and yourself,” said drama teacher Mr. Will Wright. “Directing encompasses all areas of theatre and puts a lot of responsibility on the students,” Wright said.

The students were a part of Mr. Wright’s Play Directing class, with the exception of McAuliffe. Wright presented other students involved in the drama group with the opportunity to direct a one-act.

“It is cool to work with other students in a different light than we are used to. We have a really fun time and I really enjoyed the whole process,” said junior Ann Gregory. Gregory was one of the actresses casted for Strawhecker’s piece. “One of the struggles that comes with a student director is the lack of access,” Gregory said.

Having a student in charge created difficulties with finding rehearsal space, especially when most of the student directors wanted to use the same space at the same time. Most practices ended up being held in Mr. Wright’s room during the evenings.

With a tight time frame from casting to execution, the actors and directors alike had several struggles perfecting their acts.

“Probably the most difficult part was scheduling the rehearsal time to get all of the actors together,” said senior and student director Corinne Chen. “The students are all involved in different activities after school, so it required a lot of adjustments and communications,” Chen said.

Come Friday and Saturday, performances went off without a hitch. Each act had its own unique aspects and left the audience roaring with laughter.

Each one-act exposed a completely unique facet of drama, from an act about the tribulations of being written as dead in your bank’s computer software to an act about brown shoes and walking on boxes.

The actors and actresses performed their lines with cheek and blunt sarcasm that isn’t always seen in the big performances.

Part of what made the performances so amazing was the personal aspect of it. Instead of the classic setup of chairs and drapes expanding throughout the commons, a smaller audience allowed for the chairs to be right on the stage surrounding the minimalist set.

With the audience issuing applause, it was easy to label the night as a success. This learning experience for students transformed an ordinary Friday and Saturday night into a night of entertainment for all in attendance.

Without theatre, without stories, without the lessons we learn by working together and taking that final bow, we become less human. When you see a character onstage that you can relate to, that you can empathize with, it stirs in you emotions that wouldn’t be there otherwise. It helps us understand the problems of others and even gives us insight into our own selves.”

— Will Wright

Zoe Clark

Zoe became a member of The Flightline in August of 2017. She is a senior this year involved in robotics, academic decathlon, and many other electives, and spends what little free time she has reading. You can email her at [email protected]