The Flaws of Repetitious Royalty

A person shouldn't be allowed to repeatedly win dance royalty

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The Flaws of Repetitious Royalty

My two crownings

My two crownings

Photo by Jim Stratman

My two crownings

Photo by Jim Stratman

Photo by Jim Stratman

My two crownings

Hope Stratman, Features Editor

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Another homecoming rolls around, and with it another crowning of royalty. You sit in the crowd of the commons, and, as the same couple that was crowned last year finds their heads ornamented once again, you survey the commons while your mind wanders. Your eyes eventually land on a friend sitting next to you, who was your choice on the ballot for royalty. You think of the recognition that she seems to never receive and wish that, for once, it could be someone like her getting crowned.

The crowning of dance royalty is a common practice, and it does have a function: it allows for the student body to recognize any individuals that it feels deserve recognition. However, with the way it is set up now, this practice often defeats its own purpose. As someone who has been both a spectator and a winner during the crowning of royalty, I feel qualified to say that Skutt Catholic shouldn’t allow students who have already won dance royalty to be voted back on court again for another dance.

Cutting off the crowning limit at one time would allow a higher chance for more people to get recognition. There are so many people at Skutt Catholic who deserve to be honored; every day, I see my peers sacrifice for their friends, work hard at their passions and work actively to improve others’ lives. Many of these acts are never noticed by a teacher, and the students are never formally recognized for all of the good that they do. And with many of the same people being elected onto court each year, there are fewer spots for such people to receive the recognition that they deserve.

Another downfall of a similar court year after year is that, well, it’s boring. First and foremost, it’s boring for spectators; repetition gets dull, and, especially if none of the court is a part of a spectator’s friend group, the crowning can be a pretty bland time. Putting a limit on the amount of crownings for one person can help shake things up by adding differentiation between each year’s court.

But in addition to this, the crownings can be repetitive for the crowned royalty, too. I was fortunate enough to win both at prom last year and at homecoming this year. The crowning at prom meant a lot to me; it was affirming, and it made me feel liked. But because I had already won, the homecoming crowning didn’t have close to the same significance as the first time. In fact, I went into homecoming hardly caring if I won or lost. It was lovely to win twice, and I’m certainly grateful; however, I want the recognition to mean a lot to the winner, and the second time around just didn’t mean much to me.

The intention behind crowning dance royalty seems to certainly be a good one. However, keeping the practice of allowing someone to win repeatedly isn’t the optimal way for such a system to function.

Hope Stratman - Features Editor

Hope became a member of The Flightline in August of 2016. She is a senior this year involved in activities including Speech and FBLA. Outside of school, she enjoys lists, photography, and naming inanimate objects. You can email her at [email protected]