Poem-a-Day: An Easy Way to Fulfill Your Daily Poetry Needs

This little known email service adds culture to your day

Allie+Clark+reading+%22To+a+Head+of+Lettuce%22+by+Amy+Gerstler.
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Poem-a-Day: An Easy Way to Fulfill Your Daily Poetry Needs

Allie Clark reading

Allie Clark reading "To a Head of Lettuce" by Amy Gerstler.

Photo by Zoe Clark

Allie Clark reading "To a Head of Lettuce" by Amy Gerstler.

Photo by Zoe Clark

Photo by Zoe Clark

Allie Clark reading "To a Head of Lettuce" by Amy Gerstler.

Zoe Clark, Copy Editor

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Many teens and young adults fall short on the reading of poetry, leading to a loss of creativity and deep thought. “I believe poetry matters,” English teacher Mrs. Kristen Deane said. “Poems are a quick way to challenge my thinking, which I think is necessary for being a thoughtful, critical person,” Deane explained.

Created by the Academy of American Poets in 2006, Poem-a-Day was meant to — as their mission statement claims —  foster an appreciation for contemporary poetry and support American poets. Today over 350,000 people are subscribed, a true testament to their outreach.

Each day, a new poem is sent out via social media platforms and email; it’s also available on their website, poets.org. Weekdays are reserved for poems by lesser-known writers like Amy Gerstler alongside exclusive commentary from the author, while the weekends focus on classic poetry, like Sonnet X by John Keats.

I believe poetry matters.”

— Kristen Deane

Poem-a-Day covers everything from loss to childhood, world issues, or an ode to lettuce. Each day brings a new gift of entertainment and catharsis. With so much variety, it’s worth the effort to try it out to see if Poem-a-Day is the right fit for you.

Students at Skutt Catholic have been jumping on the poetry bandwagon. “It’s a great way to get find new poets and get tons of inspiration to be creative,” said junior Josie Polacek, who has been a subscriber for nearly a year.

“For me, it’s easy because if I start reading the poem and don’t like it — which is perfectly okay — I simply delete the poem,” said Deane. “But if I begin to read and enjoy it, then I might just find meaning in what someone else has to say, which is pretty darn cool,” Deane continued.

To subscribe, one need only to go to their website. Click subscribe to Poem-a-Day, and type in their email, or go to their Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr (@poetsorg).

Zoe Clark

Zoe became a member of The Flightline in August of 2017. She is a senior this year involved in robotics, academic decathlon, and many other electives, and spends what little free time she has reading. You can email her at [email protected]