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All About that Bass, Treble, and Everything in Between

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All About that Bass, Treble, and Everything in Between

Hannah Klemme, Entertainment Editor

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Curvy is the new skinny. Or is being skinny the only solution to feeling beautiful? The media plays tug-of-war when it comes to what is the “correct” way we should view body image.

This has been as conflicting topic that never seems to dissipate, and is visible in the female population. There is one party telling us that bigger is better, while another says “nothing tastes as good as skinny feels.” It is no question as to why girls stress so much about what they look like when the “ideal” body type is constantly changing.

The music industry has recently intervened on this topic, and artists are approaching different ways to celebrate the beauty of the human body. It’s easy to get lost in the sensational beat of Meghan Trainor’s recent hit, “All About That Bass.” On the surface, the message is about embracing your beauty no matter what size you are. Looking a little deeper into the song, one can get a vibe that the lyrics are considered to be “skinny-shaming” due to the song’s lack of love for thinner body types. 

Now, I can see where creating this envious stigma towards skinnier girls is accumulated. Magazines, ads, and pop culture seem to praise the idea of having a flawless, Barbie-doll-esque figure. It’s nearly impossible to go on sites like Tumblr and not see pictures glorifying eating disorders and how trendier looks fit better on stick thin bodies.”It’s hard for average girls to feel good about themselves when all they see are pictures of stick-thin girls, so it’s just second nature for them to be envious of girls who are smaller than they are,” junior Calli Wiseman says. But just because media throws things like this in our faces gives us no right to shame when it comes to what size someone else’s body is.

There’s almost this unspoken theory that just because someone is skinny means they are content with what they see in the mirror. For senior Megan Miller, this is no foreign subject. “In middle school a group of girls called me anorexic and told me I needed to eat more food,” Miller says. “Sometimes, being skinny has to do with having a fast metabolism. I probably ate twice as much as they did.” She went on to explain how this bashing affects people mentally more than anything. “Telling someone to gain more weight isn’t a compliment. ‘You’re too skinny’ is just like telling someone ‘You’re too fat.’ Telling someone there’s something wrong with their body, even if you don’t see it as a problem, can have a lasting emotional affect on them,” says Miller.

In the real world, when a curvier girl embraces her size and flaunts what she’s got, people seem to praise her for having a positive self-image. When a thinner girl claims to love her skin and bones, she is immediately labeled as conceited and vain. The truth is, both sides of the spectrum suffer from the shaming they give each other. The bigger girls are criticized for carrying too much weight while skinnier girls are looked at with envy, as if being tiny is their natural privilege.

Everybody is born with a different body type and there’s no changing that. Shouldn’t body image be about being healthy and in shape rather than counting numbers on a scale? People get so caught up in what a perfect weight should be when we should be focusing on maintaining a healthy weight suited to our natural body type. One of the more consequential parts about being a human is that we will always be insecure about something. There’s no instructional guide to being happy with your body, but there is a way to bring your mind to peace with what you were born with. A confident, healthy body is much more attractive than the insecurities we let control our thoughts.

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All About that Bass, Treble, and Everything in Between