He’s Not Heavy, He’s My Brother

Growing up with sibling role models

Sisters+Maddie+%28right%29+and+Macy+%28left%29+Mollner
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He’s Not Heavy, He’s My Brother

Sisters Maddie (right) and Macy (left) Mollner

Sisters Maddie (right) and Macy (left) Mollner

Photo by Tim Mollner

Sisters Maddie (right) and Macy (left) Mollner

Photo by Tim Mollner

Photo by Tim Mollner

Sisters Maddie (right) and Macy (left) Mollner

Maddie Mollner, Staff Reporter

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However old or young your role models may be, they inspire you to become the best version of yourself. High school students tend to look up to those who are older than themselves, those who have lived through the things which we have yet to experience, people who can lead us through the ups and downs of our teenage lives.

Older siblings often serve as role models for students in every grade. Seeing the people they grew up next to succeed and fulfill their goals in life not only makes them proud to be their siblings, but also empowers them to succeed in the things they set out to do.

Photo by Gabby Doue
Sisters Evynne (left) and Kaiya (right) Doue

“My older sister Evynne is my biggest role model,” said sophomore Kaiya Doue. “I look up to her because I see her as an inspiring, go-getting, beautiful woman who strives for the best for her and for others. The way she reaches for the top inspires me to do better and climb to the top. The way she talks about her dreams with such love and want is amazing,” Doue continued.

Junior Rachel Sinner also looks up to her older sister. “My biggest role model is my sister Stephanie. She’s 10 years older than me so she’s been through everything that I’m going though and is good at giving advice,” Sinner commented.

Many times older siblings are looked up to because they have overcome seemingly insuperable obstacles in their lives. Having an example like this to follow shows that even with hoops to jump through, success can still be in your grasp.

“Growing up [Stephanie] struggled in school because of a learning disability she has, but she overcame it and still managed to get good grades. She graduated from college a couple years ago and had to work harder than most kids,” stated Sinner.

Photo by Debbie Sinner
Sisters Stephanie (left) and Rachel (right) Sinner

Siblings’ accomplishments can also serve as inspiration. Seeing them succeed gives students confidence in themselves, while also creating that beloved sibling rivalry.

“Evynne is only 22 and her dreams are already at the tips of her fingers. She applies herself to her projects with passion and hard work,” added Doue. “The way she reaches for the top inspires me to do better and climb to the top. The way she talks about her dreams with such love and want is amazing,” Doue went on.

Role models help shape students at Skutt Catholic into the people they are today and the people they have yet to become. Without them, who knows where anyone would end up. Whether you look up to a sibling, parent, teacher, or friend, these people provide essential guidance to succeed, in high school and beyond.

Maddie Mollner

Maddie joined The Flightline in January of 2017. She is a senior this year, involved in cheerleading. Outside of school, she reads, collects flamboyant socks and hangs out in parks with her friends. You can email her at [email protected]