Student News of Skutt Catholic High School

The Flightline

  • 5/10 : Spring Choir Concert in the Skutt Catholic Commons @ 7

  • 5/4 : Hawk Walk!

The Show Must Go On

Theatre Department performs Antigone despite Icemaggedon and the flu.

Photo by Maddie Jarosik

Kayley Anderson, Editor-in-Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Few things scared parents and teachers as much as the predicted ice storm this week; with chances of an inch of ice coating the roads, it’s no surprise that canceling the final showing of Antigone was an option.

Sophomore Joseph McAuliffe hangs out backstage during Sunday’s performance. Pc: Kayley Anderson

For those unfamiliar with the show’s plot, Antigone is the story of the ruling family of Thebes, who after a war between brothers, runs into a whole lot of trouble. The main characters Antigone and Creon face off when Antigone breaks a law by burying her other brother and is sentenced to die. This starts a chain reaction that ends in disaster, fitting for a day with a high chance of a massive ice storm.

The theatre department shocked everyone when, despite the oncoming storm, they continued to perform. Moving the show up an hour and a half earlier, the small cast of about twenty people took the stage to perform the Greek tragedy one last time.

“It was a delight to see each night and what’s even more important is that I saw how each of them grew during the process,” said director Will Wright. Mr. Wright made the decision to continue the show no matter how small the audience or the factor of the oncoming ice.

The ice wasn’t the only thing on the actors’ minds, though. Several members of the cast and crew were sick with something resembling the flu.

Junior Chris King plays King Creon weeping over his dead family. Pc: Maddie Jarosik

“It wasn’t uncommon for people to walk off stage to go get sick after their scenes,” said senior makeup designer Sarah Schrader. “I got so sick I couldn’t even make it to Sunday’s show. I’m really proud of the cast though because, even though they were sick, they still went on and gave it their all. Even if they weren’t sick, they made changes to help those who were.”

The camaraderie was one thing that everyone on the cast seemed to feel and the thing most people credited with its success.“The play was honestly one of the best things I’ve been a part of at Skutt,” said senior Becky Snowden. “Everyone put in great effort and were very supportive of each other. We worked hard, had fun, and were close to each other, which made performing such a downer play easier. For all the frowns onstage, there were a million laughs offstage.” Snowden played the lead, Antigone, and was one of the highlights of the show.

Though the play ends with tragedy, the theatre department’s production of it was certainly not, and the epitome of the phrase, ‘the show must go on.’

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    Beyond the Artist

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    The Sweet Sound of Success

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    “The Point Isn’t the Points; The Point Is The Poetry”

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    “The Skin of Our Teeth,” Explained

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    Photo Essay: Art Program Earns Fifth National Award

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    Experimental Rocket Society: Skutt Catholic’s Rock Band

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    The Ins and Outs of Vivace

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    A Trip for Improvements and Achievements

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    Show Choir’s Unrecognized Heroes

  • The Show Must Go On

    Arts

    Jessi Wessel: Writing Extraordinaire

Student News of Skutt Catholic High School
The Show Must Go On